Five Common Questions About Criminal Defense Cases

An arrest is likely to be one of life's most stressful moments. However, there are steps that you can take immediately to protect your rights and options to minimize any negative effects. Below are just a few of the questions that clients ask Keith Gore, Lawyer.

1. I Didn't Do Anything Wrong. Won't the Police Understand That?

If you are the target of an investigation, there is no way to talk yourself out of anything. When they interview you, police and prosecutors are looking for you to slip up. They will use any inconsistency in your story or failure to remember details against you. Additionally, they may use your own words against you. Remember that you have the right to remain silent – use it!

2. Do I Really Need an Attorney?

If you have been arrested, you absolutely need an experienced criminal defense attorney's guidance and advocacy. Even for a relatively minor misdemeanor, your attorney will be better able to negotiate a reduction or dismissal of charges. Keith Gore understands the rules of evidence and how to present a case to a judge and jury. He also has experience working with the courts, prosecutors, and judges here in Collin County and throughout North Texas. He can put his reputation and track record to work for you.

3. What Will Happen to Me?

Your case can go in many different directions. However, by working with a proven trial lawyer like Keith Gore, you can be sure that you are working with an attorney who will protect your rights and will not try to talk you into accepting a plea deal that is not in your best interests.

4. Do I Have to Let Police into My House?

If police knock on your door and ask to come in and have a look around, ask them to show you a search warrant approved by a judge first. If they do not have a warrant, you do not have to let them in. The same goes for if police ask to search your car during a traffic stop. Say "no!" You should contact an attorney as soon as possible.

5. Do I Have to Take a Field Sobriety Test?

There are no penalties for refusing field sobriety tests, including those involving a portable Breathalyzer. If you refuse the test, however, police may still choose to arrest you. By refusing, though, you are denying police crucial evidence that they can use against you, such as an accidental slip while trying to walk in a straight line.

To learn more, contact Keith Gore, Lawyer, at his office in McKinney, Texas, today by calling 972-924-5665 to schedule a consultation.